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Hello, My name is Alexander JACQUES. I am an Artistic Director, working out of Paris, France. Since 2006, I have chosen to observe the facades of buildings from the world's largest cities with a new eye. We spend all day walking past these buildings without raising our heads to glance at them. They are part of our daily lives, but we do not pay attention to them or we just think they're plain ugly. This project showcases the buildings, but from an different angle. I hope you will appreciate these pictures, and that you take the time to peruse these facades. Feel free to send me an email. I'd be happy to talk with you about my work. Do not hesitate either to like my Facebook page where you will find all the latest news from the project and focuses on the best architectural projects in the world. And one last thing, the purpose of the shop is not only mercantile: by purchasing prints, you will help me continue this project by funding trips abroad. Thank you very much in advance for your puchases.

Architectural Pattern

Architectural Pattern focuses on modern facades. At the boundaries between graphic design and photography, this project invites you to take a new look at chosen facades often considered invasive or degrading. The repetition of horizontal and vertical lines or a single pattern loses the viewer in a world where boundaries disapear. In the middle of such a mass Man no longer seems to exist.

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  • Paris

    Tour Espace 2000

    Tower Space 2000 is a residential skyscraper located in the Front de Seine in the 15th arrondissement of Paris, France.

    Architect : -

    Roof : 98 m (321 ft)

    Floor count : 31 floors

    Construction end : 1976

  • Paris

    Arche de la défense

    A great national design competition was launched in 1982 as the initiative of French president François Mitterrand. Danish architect Johann Otto von Spreckelsen (1929–1987) and Danish engineer Erik Reitzel designed the winning entry to be a 20th-century version of the Arc de Triomphe: a monument to humanity and humanitarian ideals rather than military victories. The construction of the monument began in 1985. Spreckelsen resigned on July 1986 and ratified the transfer of all his architectural responsibilities to his associate, French architect Paul Andreu. Reitzel continued his work until the monument was completed in 1989.
    The Arche is in the approximate shape of a cube (width: 108m, height: 110m, depth: 112m); it has been suggested that the structure looks like a hypercube (a tesseract) projected onto the three-dimensional world. It has a prestressed concrete frame covered with glass and Carrara marble from Italy and was built by the French civil engineering company Bouygues.
    North façade of the Grande Arche de la Défense.
    La Grande Arche was inaugurated in July 1989, with grand military parades that marked the bicentennial of the French revolution. It completed the line of monuments that forms the Axe historique running through Paris. The Arche is turned at an angle of 6.33° on this axis. The most important reason for this turn was technical: With a métro station, an RER station, and a motorway all situated directly underneath the Arche, the angle was the only way to accommodate the structure's giant foundations. From an architectural point of view, the turn emphasizes the depth of the monument, and is similar to the turn of the Louvre at the other end of the Axe historique.
    View of the Arc de Triomphe from the Grande Arche
    In addition, the Arche is placed so that it forms a secondary axe (axis) with the two highest buildings in Paris, the Tour Eiffel and the Tour Montparnasse.
    The two sides of the Arche house government offices. The roof section was an exhibition centre, housing the Musée de l'Informatique (Computing Museum). The vertical structure visible in the photograph is the lift scaffolding. Views of Paris are to be had from the lifts taking visitors to the roof.
    After a non-injury accident in the elevators in April 2010, the Department of Ecology, owner of the roof of the Grande Arche, decided to permanently close the computer museum, restaurant, and viewing deck. Access to the roof is still possible via the elevators in the north and south walls, but they are closed to the public.

    Architect : Johann Otto von Spreckelsen, Paul Andreu, Peter Rice

    Roof : 110 m (360 ft)

    Floor count : 35

    Construction end : 1989

  • Paris

    Tour Pacific

    Pacific Tower (also called Arcelor) is an office skyscraper located in the business district of the French Defence (specifically in Puteaux, in the district of La Défense 7).
    This building has the distinction of having a flat front and a curved facade, a form which had already been used in Defense (tower Sequoia). The tower was hollow in the center to allow a pedestrian to reach the tower Kupka, what might be called "twin sister" of the Pacific because of the same shape.
    This tower has hosted the particular seat Usinor, then became Arcelor, from 1996 to April 2006. Since it is the Societe Generale, which took over the offices.

    Architect : Kisho Kurokawa

    Roof : 90 m (295 ft)

    Floor count : 25

    Construction end : 1992

  • Paris

    Tour Ariane

    Tour Ariane (previously known as tour Générale between 1973–1995) is an office skyscraper located in La Défense, the high-rise business district situated west of Paris. Built in 1975, it belongs to the 2nd generation of skyscrapers in La Défense. Despite a very conventional design, the tower offers an interesting and original cladding. The entrance of the tower was modified in the 1990s. The tower is currently undergoing major refurbishment. The tower is owned by Unibail-Rodamco.

    Architect : Robert Zammit, Jean de Mailly

    Roof : 152 m (499 ft)

    Floor count : 36

    Construction end : 1975

  • Paris

    BNF

    The Bibliothèque nationale de France is the National Library of France, located in Paris. It is intended to be the repository of all that is published in France. On 14 July 1988, President François Mitterrand announced the construction and the expansion of one of the largest and most modern libraries in the world, intended to cover all fields of knowledge, and designed to be accessible to all, using the most modern data transfer technologies, which could be consulted from a distance, and which would collaborate with other European libraries. Surprisingly, the library does not maintain a wireless network. In July 1989, the services of the architectural firm of Dominique Perrault were retained. The construction was carried out by Bouygues. Construction of the library ran into huge cost overruns and technical difficulties related to its high-rise design, so much so that it is commonly referred to as the "TGB" or "Très Grande Bibliothèque" (i.e. "Very Large Library," a sarcastic allusion to France's successful high-speed rail system, the TGV). After the move of the major collections from the rue de Richelieu, the National Library of France was inaugurated on 15 December 1996. It contains more than ten million volumes.

    Architect : Dominique Perrault

    Roof : 79 m (259 ft)

    Floor count : 24

    Construction end : 1995

  • Paris

    BNF

    The Bibliothèque nationale de France is the National Library of France, located in Paris. It is intended to be the repository of all that is published in France. On 14 July 1988, President François Mitterrand announced the construction and the expansion of one of the largest and most modern libraries in the world, intended to cover all fields of knowledge, and designed to be accessible to all, using the most modern data transfer technologies, which could be consulted from a distance, and which would collaborate with other European libraries. Surprisingly, the library does not maintain a wireless network. In July 1989, the services of the architectural firm of Dominique Perrault were retained. The construction was carried out by Bouygues. Construction of the library ran into huge cost overruns and technical difficulties related to its high-rise design, so much so that it is commonly referred to as the "TGB" or "Très Grande Bibliothèque" (i.e. "Very Large Library," a sarcastic allusion to France's successful high-speed rail system, the TGV). After the move of the major collections from the rue de Richelieu, the National Library of France was inaugurated on 15 December 1996. It contains more than ten million volumes.

    Architect : Dominique Perrault

    Roof : 79 m (259 ft)

    Floor count : 24

    Construction end : 1995

  • Paris

    Cœur Défense

    With 350,000 m² (3.77 million sq. ft), it is the building with the most floor space in Europe along with the Palace of Parliament in Bucharest. Coeur Défense was built in 2001, replacing the former Esso Tower, the first building of the old generation to be destroyed in La Défense. Cœur Défense is a large complex made of two main bodies connected to one another by a smaller body and seating on a wide basis made of several smaller bodies. The edges of all bodies are rounded. The cladding is white, with large windows. An electronic system monitors white blinds which can be drawn or opened all together at the same time. The two main bodies are 161 m (528 ft) tall each. Both of them are relatively thin as their width is only 24 m (79 ft), and they are out of line with each other, so that sunlight can reach all parts of the building. Lehman Brothers' €2.1bn top-of-the-market purchase of Coeur Défense, could become Europe's largest distressed property sale. Due to falling property values, and the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers, the transaction is under stress. The Borrower who owns the building has placed itself under sauveguarde.

    Architect : Jean-Paul Viguier

    Roof : 162 m (531 ft)

    Floor count : 45

    Construction end : 2001

  • Paris

    Tour Novotel

    The building is located at number 61, Quai de Grenelle in the 15th arrondissement of Paris. It was built in 1976 under the name of Hotel Nikko for Japan Airlines. Between 2001, date of redemption by the Accor Group and 2003, when the reopening of the hotel under the Novotel brand, € 25 million were invested to remove the Japanese style of the hotel. With 764 rooms, this is one of the finest establishments in Paris in terms of capacity, rated "jumbo". It is also the second four-star Novotel Paris with the Novotel Les Halles, ranking kept by the previous owner and its facilities (pool, sauna, gym). The building is particularly visible in the neighborhood Front-de-Seine with his 1068 red window frames. With the Tower and the Tower Crystal Totem is one of the most original buildings of the Front de Seine.

    Architect : Julien Penven, Jean-Claude Le Bail

    Roof : 100 m (328 ft)

    Floor count : 31

    Construction end : 1976

  • Paris

    Tours Chassagne et Alicante

    Société Générale Twin Towers are two office skyscrapers located in La Défense. Their exterior designs are exactly identical. The roof and structural height of both towers is at 167 m (548 ft) above ground. The towers were the tallest skyscrapers built in La Défense since the Tour Total in 1985. The northern tower is named tour Alicante and the southern one tour Chassagne. In its interior design, Chassagne is decorated with white stone from the village of Chassagne in Auvergne, whereas Alicante is decorated with red marble from Alicante in Spain. Both towers share the same platform and stand about 40 m (130 ft) apart. The roofs of the towers are sharply inclined. Despite the large office space available in the current twin towers, Société Générale needed yet more space and so it launched the construction of a third skyscraper, the 183 m (600 ft) tall Tour Granite, which stands immediately behind the twin towers and was opened in 2008.

    Architect : Michel Andrault, Pierre Parat, Nicolas Ayoub

    Roof : 167 m (548 ft)

    Floor count : 37

    Construction end : 1976

  • Paris

    Tour Égée

    Tour Égée (also known as tour Ernst&Young) is an office skyscraper located in La Défense. Tour Égée was built in 1999 by Michel Andrault and Nicolas Ayoub, architects from Conceptua. A twin of Tour Égée, Tour Adria, was built nearby three years later in 2002. The only difference between both towers consists in their cladding: the one from Adria is darker when the one from Égée is lighter with a glass cladding giving an interesting feeling of vertical and horizontal stripes crossing at the level of each window. Tour Égée is 155 m (509 ft) tall and has a triangular floorplan.

    Architect : Michel Andrault, Pierre Parat, Nicolas Ayoub

    Roof : 155 m (509 ft)

    Floor count : 40

    Construction end : 1999

  • Paris

    Tours Adria

    Built in 2002 by Michel Andrault and Nicolas Ayoub, architects from Conceptua, it is a twin of the nearby Tour Égée, which was built three years before in 1999. The only difference between both towers consists in their cladding: the one from Égée is white when the one from Adria is darker with windows looking like vertical glass stripes. Since its construction it has been occupied by the French engineering company Technip as its group headquarters.

    Architect : Michel Andrault, Pierre Parat, Nicolas Ayoub

    Roof : 155 m (509 ft)

    Floor count : 40

    Construction end : 1999

  • Paris

    Tour Mirabeau

    This tower is the most southerly of Front-de-Seine, close to the Pont Mirabeau. It is composed of three branches and forms a triangular island surrounded by the Quai André-Citroën, Avenue Émile Zola and the rue de Javel. It hosts the headquarters of the particular CSA and BRGM and various central government departments of the Ministry of Labour, Solidarity and Civil Service.

    Architect : Pierre-Paul Heckly, Noël Le Maresquier

    Roof :

    Floor count : 18

    Construction end : 1972

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  • New York

    Two World Financial Center

    Two World Financial Center is one of the largest skyscrapers in New York City. The building is the second tallest of the four buildings in the World Financial Center complex that stands in southwest Manhattan. It is similar in design to Three World Financial Center, except that its roof is dome-shaped rather than 3 WFC's solid pyramid design. Two World Financial Center was severely damaged by the falling debris when the World Trade Center towers collapsed due to the September 11 attacks. The building had to be closed for repairs from September 11, 2001 until May 2002 as a result of damage sustained in the terrorist attacks.

    Architect : Cesar Pelli and Haines Lundberg Waehler

    Roof : 196.5 m (643 ft)

    Floor count : 51 floors

    Construction end : 1987

  • New York

    Marine Midland Building

    The building is known for the distinctive sculpture at its entrance, Isamu Noguchi's Cube. Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the man who designed the building, had originally proposed a monolith type sculpture, but it was deemed to be too expensive. A bombing occurred on the 8th floor on August 20, 1969, injuring 20 people. The bomb, which police estimated to be the equivalent of 25 sticks of dynamite, was placed in a hallway just off the elevators some time during the evening and it exploded at around 10:30PM. The injured were on the night shift in the bank's stock bookkeeping department and were working on the other side of the corridor wall. Fortunately, the inside of this wall was lined with floor-to-ceiling automated file units that weighed 3 tons each and which absorbed most of the blast.

    Architect : Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

    Roof : 206 m (677 ft)

    Floor count : 51 floors

    Construction end : 1967

  • New York

    1221 Avenue of the Americas

    1221 Avenue of the Americas, also known as the McGraw-Hill Building is one of several buildings which are part of the Rockefeller Center complex expansion in the 1960s.
    The buildings are featured in the opening credits of Saturday Night Live, seen from below looking up in the street from a car. It was used for the exteriors and lobby of Elias-Clarke's headquarters in the 2006 film The Devil Wears Prada. It is also the headquarters of Sirius XM Radio, and many radio shows broadcast from the building including Opie & Anthony and The Howard Stern Show.

    Architect : Wallace Harrison

    Roof : 205 m (674 ft)

    Floor count : 51 floors

    Construction end : 1969

  • New York

    One Liberty Plaza

    One Liberty Plaza, formerly the U.S. Steel Building is currently owned and operated by Brookfield Office Properties. The building had a substantial renovation in 1989, which involved the creation of a new lobby and elevator system. The lobby and elevators have an extensive security system, and the building has a connection to the New York City Subway in the basement. The building sits next to the World Trade Center site. Following the events of September 11, 2001, the building had broken windows and light facade damage. Brooks Brothers on the ground floor of the building was used as a temporary morgue in the days following the attack. As of 2006, it is the 188th tallest building in the world.

    Architect : Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

    Roof : 226.5m (743ft)

    Floor count : 54 floors

    Construction end : 1973

  • New York

    New York Marriott Marquis

    The hotel was born in controversy because five historic theaters—the Helen Hayes, the Morosco, the Astor, the Bijou, and the Gaiety—were demolished to clear the site. Protesters, including Christopher Reeve (then at the height of his Superman fame) tried to stop the destruction, even forcing a Supreme Court challenge, but it was too late. What was dubbed "The Great Theater Massacre of 1982" went forward to make way for the hotel. By the time construction began, original operators Western International Hotels (today Westin) had dropped out of the project and Marriott had stepped in.At the time the hotel was built, it featured Manhattan's largest grand ballroom and its first revolving restaurant, a three-story, 1,500-seat theater, a second and third ballroom, and 100,000 square feet (9,300 m2) of meeting, banquet and exhibition spaces.

    Architect : John Portman & Associates

    Roof : 175 m (574 ft)

    Floor count : 49 floors

    Construction end : 1985

  • New York

    New York times Building

    The New York Times Building is a skyscraper on the west side of Midtown Manhattan that was completed in 2007. Its chief tenant is The New York Times Company, publisher of The New York Times as well as The Boston Globe, the International Herald Tribune, and other newspapers. The tower was designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FXFOWLE Architects, with Gensler providing interior design.The lighting design for the buildings nighttime identity was designed by the Office for Visual Interaction Inc. The building, like many in midtown Manhattan, has no on-site parking, with most employees arriving by public transit. Since December 2007, building management has provided an indoor parking area for 20 bicycles.

    Architect : Renzo Piano Building Workshop, FXFOWLE Architects

    Roof : 319 m (1,046 ft)

    Floor count : 52 floors

    Construction end : 2007

  • New York

    7 World Trade center

    David Childs of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill worked in conjunction with glass artist and designer James Carpenter to create a design that uses ultra-clear, low-iron glass to provide reflectivity and light, with stainless-steel spandrels behind the glass to help reflect sunlight. Stainless steel used in the building façade is molybdenum-containing Type 316, which provides improved resistance to corrosion. To enclose the power substation and improve its aesthetics, the base of the building has a curtain wall with stainless steel louvers that provide ventilation for the machinery. During the day, the curtain wall reflects light, while at night it is illuminated with blue LED lights. The curtain wall around the lobby uses heavily laminated, heat-strengthened glass that meets high standards for blast resistance. At night, a large cube of light above the lobby also emanates blue light, while during the day it provides white light to the lobby, and at dusk it transitions to violet and back to blue. Inside the main lobby, artist Jenny Holzer created a large light installation with glowing text moving across wide plastic panels. The entire wall, which is 65 ft (20 m) wide and 14 ft (4.3 m) tall, changes color according to the time of day. Holzer worked with Klara Silverstein, the wife of Larry Silverstein, to select poetry for the art installation. The wall is structurally fortified as a security measure. The building is being promoted as the safest skyscraper in the U.S.

    Architect : David Childs

    Roof : 226m (741 ft)

    Floor count : 52 floors

    Construction end : 2006

  • New York

    Socony Mobil Building

    A curtain wall of seven thousand embossed stainless steel panels gives the Socony-Mobil Building a unique presence on the midtown skyline. Constructed between 1954 and 1956, this impressive skyscraper fills an entire block, extending from 42nd to 41st Streets, and from Lexington to Third Avenues. In terms of architectural style, it occupies a transition between the masonry-clad, wedding-cake-setback, Art Deco buildings that were common before it and the post-1960 glass-and-steel slabs of the International Style. In fact, the architects, Harrison & Abramowitz, originally designed the structure with a masonry exterior, but completely redesigned it during 1953 and 1954 as a metal-sheathed building. Besides the embossed surfaces, what is most unusual about the metal exterior is that it is stainless steel, rather than aluminum more commonly used. Stainless was more expensive than aluminum, but the developers had close connections to United States Steel Corporation, who wanted to promote steel as an alternative to aluminum. US Steel actually made up the extra cost of stainless.

    Architect : Harrison & Abramovitz

    Roof : 174,35m (572 ft)

    Floor count : 42 floors

    Construction end : 1956

  • New York

    2 Penn Plaza

    Two Penn Plaza and Madison Square Garden are arguably one of New York's most hated buildings, due to the fact that the two massive boxy buildlings replaced the Grand Beaux-Arts Structure of the Pennsylvania Station in 1968. Often called the 'tombstone' of the original Penn Station. Due to the demolition of Pennsylvania Station, Two Penn is the headquarters of the MSG Network, radio stations WABC and WPLJ, and the Association for Computing Machinery.

    Architect : Charles Luckman Associates

    Roof : 125m (410 ft)

    Floor count : 29 floors

    Construction end : 1968

  • New York

    FBI building

    Jacob K. Javits Federal Office Building (named for influential U.S. senator from New York) at 26 Federal Plaza in the Civic Center, which houses many federal government agencies, including the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Bureau of Investigation New York City field office. The federal building falls under the jurisdiction of the United States Federal Protective Service for any and all law enforcement and protection issues.

    Architect : Alfred E. Poor, Kahn & Jacobs, Eggers & Higgins

    Roof : 179 m (588 ft)

    Floor count : 41 floors

    Construction end : 1967

  • New York

    666 Fifth Avenue

    666 Fifth Avenue is a office building on Fifth Avenue between 52nd and 53rd Streets in New York City.The Tishman family via Tishman Realty and Construction built the 1,500,000-square-foot (140,000 m2) tower in 1957. It was designed by Carson & Lundin and the building was called the Tishman Building. One of its most famous exterior features was the prominent 666 address emblazoned on the top of the building. The other distinctive exterior features are embossed aluminum panels. In December 2006, Tishman Speyer Properties along with the German investment firm TMW announced the sale of the building to the Kushner Properties for $1.8 billion, the highest price ever paid for an individual building in Manhattan. The deal turned heads since at 483 ft (147 m) the building is not even on the list of tallest buildings in New York City. However, it is considered a trophy building because of its location on Fifth Avenue across from Rockefeller Center. Kushner sold the retail condominium portion of 666 Fifth to a Stanley Chera led group for $525 million.

    Architect : Carson & Lundin

    Roof : 147m (483 ft)

    Floor count : 41 floors

    Construction end : 1957

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  • Brisbane

    Brisbane Square

    Two of the four distinctive, rectangular, coloured spaces near the base of the building contain the new Brisbane City Council and Brisbane Square Library. Brisbane Square is the largest commercial office building in Australia to have been awarded a 5 star Green Star rating. The original development application included a number of residential floors on the top of the building, however this was rejected on the basis that noise levels would be too excessive. Construction of the non typical skyscraper was completed in late 2006, an outstanding performance for such a complex highrise structure.

    Architect : Denton Corker Marshall Pty Ltd

    Roof : 165.00 m

    Floor count : 38 floors

    Construction end : 2006

  • Brisbane

    Santos Place

    Santos Place was designed by Donovan Hill Architect, and constructed by Hutchinson Builders (in a Design & Construct procurement method). The total cost of the building's construction is A$270 million and it provides 33 000 m2 of floor area. Santos Place is Australia's largest building to a receive a 6 star green building design rating. It features energy efficiency measures such as "high performance double glazing, substantial external sun shading, state of the art ventilation and an energy-efficient gas-powered trigeneration system". Sensored lighting switches off automatically if no movement is detected after five minutes. Rainwater is collected on the roof and stored in tanks on the top of the building. Solar panels collect 90% of the buildings electricity needs. Construction of the building was done with 20% recycled concrete and 90% recycled steel. It includes a two-level gymnasium and 280 secured basement bicycle parks.

    Architect : Donovan Hill

    Roof : 150m (492 ft)

    Floor count : 38 floors

    Construction end : 2009